“The difference between ordinary and extraordinary is practice.” – Vladimir Horowitz

With our Spring Presentations just around the corner, it’s time to evaluate how prepared your child is for the big day! Have you been practicing with them? Do they know their lines? Do they know their cue lines? How about their movements? Are they making big character choices as they practice? Are they projecting their voice?

If you aren’t sure of the answer to these questions (or if the answer is no!) now is the time to really focus on practicing! Remember – our plays are not about one character shining on the stage. Our plays are a total team effort! The strength of our ensemble relies on the dedication and enthusiasm of our players. Think of our rehearsals as a team-sport practice. On a team you want each player to be able to trust each other and work together. If someone isn’t doing well, they are expected to practice to improve their skills so they can play the game to the best of their abilities. The same principles apply to drama as well!

Of course, the possibility of disappointing the ensemble shouldn’t be the only motivation to practice! Practice is the path to true growth and improvement. Practice hones abilities, strengthens confidence, and improves overall performance! We promise your child will feel infinitely more excited and prepared on the day of their performance if they put in the extra work at home. Plus, the sense of pride they will feel at the end will be priceless!

That being said… are we expecting perfection? Nope! We know mistakes happen – heck, we teachers even flub onstage from time to time! However, we sincerely believe that practicing will allow our Drama Kids to feel more comfortable on stage, even in the event of a mistake or a missed line. If they put in the effort now, they will have much more FUN as they perform!

So how can you help prepare your Drama Kid for the big day? Read our tips below to help you get the most out of your rehearsal time!

  • Don’t overwork them! Rehearsing for a few minutes a day is much more beneficial than rehearsing for a big chunk of time the night before class.
  • Be sure you read their cue lines! A cue line is a line right before their own. They not only need to know their lines, but WHEN to say them! (It’s also beneficial to read a few lines BEFORE their cues as well, so they really know when to be on alert!)
  • Make sure your child is projecting their voice! We want everyone to hear them, even those at the back of the house!
  • Make sure your child is also practicing their movements and character as they say their lines! Ask your Drama Kid how their character stands, sits, gestures, and if they have any dances they should be practicing as well! Muscle memory is very important in the rehearsal process!
  • Sometimes writing lines down on a piece of paper helps children memorize faster!
  • Try singing your lines. This might help if your Drama Kid loves singing and can aid in memorization!
  • Record your child saying their lines AND cue lines. Play it again and again, then join in, and then try without it. It’s like learning the lyrics to a song… the more you listen to it, the better you are at “singing” along with the recording.
  • And of course – repetition, repetition, repetition! 🙂

To learn more about how the Drama Kids program can provide a quality after-school drama education to your child, contact your local DK today!! Find a Drama Kids near you today!