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Back To School Tips For Teens

by | Aug 15, 2022 | Blog, Home Page

With summer break getting closer to its end, the time to prepare your child for the new school year is fast-approaching. While our team at Drama Kids International offers drama programs for kids and teens all year long, we still appreciate and understand the prep work that goes into getting them ready for a new school year. We hope that these tips prove beneficial to you as the back-to-school season gears up!

Heading back to school signals a time of transition: new classes, new teachers, new schedules, and a new social scene. Here are some ways to make the transition from summer to school a little easier.

Avoid a Crazy First Day

How can you combat first-day chaos? If you’re headed to a new school, try to arrange a visit before classes begin. Explore any areas that are of particular interest, such as the gym, library, or theatre.

Pack your backpack the night before school starts so you’re not scrambling around at the last minute looking for what you need.

Set out your outfit the night before as well. Wear an outfit that makes you feel good, whether it’s a brand-new outfit or a comfy old sweater. If you plan to wear a new pair of shoes, break them in a few days beforehand.

New place = New Emotions

It’s perfectly normal to feel nervous on the first day of school. Getting back to the school routine and adjusting to new workloads takes some getting used to after a long summer break. If you’re having a trouble mentally, think back to some previous “first days.” Everything probably settled down pretty quickly once you got into the routine.

Meeting new people or getting reacquainted with classmates can feel overwhelming, especially if you’re shy or reserved. Start small: If large groups make you nervous, try saying hello to one or two new people a day rr ask new people to sit with you in the cafeteria.

If you still feel uncomfortable after a few days, talk to the school guidance counselor, a favorite teacher, or someone else you trust about how you’re feeling and what you can do. But give yourself time — most problems adjusting to school are only temporary.

Feeling Burnt Out

School seemed simple when you were younger. Everyone told you where to go, what classes to take, and how to finish your homework. Now things are different; there are so many choices and priorities competing for your time. Stretch yourself too thin and you may find yourself feeling stressed out.

Here are some things you can do to help regain control:

  • Plan ahead. Get a wall calendar or personal planner. Mark the dates of midterms, finals, and other tests. Note the due dates of term papers, essays, and other projects as they are assigned. List any other time commitments you have, like basketball practice or play rehearsals. When your calendar starts to fill, learn to say no to additional activities until things calm down.
  • Stay ahead. Try not to fall behind. If you feel yourself falling behind and starting to feel frustrated, let your teachers know. It’s better to get help early on than to wait and think you can ace the final if you spend a few nights cramming.
  • Listen up. Paying attention in class can actually pay off in the long run. Actively listening and taking notes during lectures can make recalling information easier when it comes time to study and remember things.
  • Take notes. If you take notes and review them before class begins (or while studying for an exam), you can ask a teacher to go over anything you don’t understand. It can also be helpful to go over notes with a friend after class Learning good note-taking skills in high school also helps put you ahead of the curve in college, when good lecture notes are key to studying and doing well.

Survival Tips

Here are some more things that can help put you ahead in school:

  • The old saying “breakfast is the most important meal of the day” is never more true than when you’re going to school. Students are more alert and perform better in class if they eat a good breakfast.
  • Get enough sleep. Studies show that teens need at least 8½ hours of sleep each night to feel rested. Sleep deprivation can lead students to fall asleep in class and can also make it hard to concentrate. It can be more productive to get the sleep you need than it is to stay up late cramming: A recent study found that students who got adequate sleep before a math test were nearly three times more likely to figure out the problem than those who stayed up all night.
  • Do more at school and you’ll have less to do at home. Take advantage of those times during the school day when you’re not in class: Review notes, go to the library or computer lab, get a head-start on your homework, or research that big term paper.
  • One of the best ways to make friends and learn your way around is by joining school clubs, sports teams, and activities. Even if you can’t kick a 30-yard field goal or sing a solo, getting involved in other ways — going to a school play, helping with a bake sale, or cheering on friends at a swim meet — can help you feel like a part of things. If you are dramatically inclined, or simply have an interest in participating in a fun, exciting activity where you can express yourself each week, don’t forget to check out the programs that Drama Kids offers! Drama Kids classes are carefully designed to be fun and challenging, while helping each teen to develop public speaking and communication skills.

We hope that you enjoy the rest of summer break and that the upcoming back-to-school season doesn’t prove too stressful! Remember, if it’s drama classes for teens you’re looking for, Drama Kids International is the place to go!

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